UK & destination wedding photographer

Destination Wedding Photographer

Taiwan

- Wedding Photography -

Wedding Photographer Taiwan

Wedding Photographer Taiwan

Hello If you’re reading this it’s likely that you’re looking for a wedding photographer for your wedding day in Taiwan (great location by the way ).. needless to say  I’m so glad you decided to visit my web page ,  if you have the time why not stay and take a look around at some of my work, you can visit my portfolio HERE, or even see some real weddings HERE I’m pretty confident  you can find many reasons to choose us to photograph your wedding day in Taiwan.

Why choose me for you photography?

My name is  David,  I am an award winning destination wedding photographer who loves the fun, atmosphere and the all round celebration of weddings, I offer a unique contemporary approach photographing a wedding, I often appeal to the non-traditionalist, stylish yet contemporary couple. Based in Newcastle upon Tyne ,England, I capture weddings all across the UK, and around Europe and the World . 

I’m so very passionate about what I do, I find inspiration all around me and love to use any available light to by advantage and use additional light for the more creative image. I have had the pleasure of photographing in Taiwan on a few occasions, the architecture of Taiwan lends itself to stylish wedding photography.

I take pleasure in playing an integral role in two people tying the knot but I’m a firm believer in the fact that a wedding is so much more than exchanging words and work to capture every emotion felt and each special moment, translating the true joy of the day through stylish imagery.

 Where ever you are in the world, I’d love to be part of it.. I look forward to hear from you.

David -x-

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A little about wedding photography at the Taiwan

Coordinates: 24°N 121°E / 24°N 121°E / 24; 121

Taiwan (traditional Chinese: 臺灣/台灣; simplified Chinese: 台湾; pinyin: Táiwān),[II] officially the Republic of China (ROC), is a country in East Asia. Neighbouring countries include the People’s Republic of China (PRC) to the northwest, Japan to the northeast, and the Philippines to the south. The main island of Taiwan has an area of 35,808 square kilometres (13,826 sq mi), with mountain ranges dominating the eastern two-thirds and plains in the western third, where its highly urbanised population is concentrated. Taipei is the capital as well as the largest metropolitan area of Taiwan. Other major cities include New Taipei, Kaohsiung, Taichung, Tainan and Taoyuan. With 23.57 million inhabitants, Taiwan is among the most densely populated countries.

Austronesian-speaking ancestors of Taiwanese indigenous peoples settled the island around 6,000 years ago. In the 17th century, large-scale Han Chinese immigration to western Taiwan began under a Dutch colony and continued under the Kingdom of Tungning. The island was annexed in 1683 by the Qing dynasty of China, and ceded to the Empire of Japan in 1895. The Republic of China, which had overthrown the Qing in 1911, took control of Taiwan on behalf of the World War II Allies following the surrender of Japan in 1945. The resumption of the Chinese Civil War resulted in the ROC’s loss of mainland China to forces of the Chinese Communist Party and retreat to Taiwan in 1949. Its effective jurisdiction has since been limited to Taiwan and numerous smaller islands.

In the early 1960s, Taiwan entered a period of rapid economic growth and industrialisation called the “Taiwan Miracle”. In the late 1980s and early 1990s, the ROC transitioned from a one-party military dictatorship to a multi-party democracy with a semi-presidential system. Taiwan’s export-oriented industrial economy is the 21st-largest in the world by nominal GDP, and 20th-largest by PPP measures, with major contributions from steel, machinery, electronics and chemicals manufacturing. Taiwan is a developed country, ranking 15th in GDP per capita. It is ranked highly in terms of political and civil liberties, education, health care and human development.

The political status of Taiwan is contentious. The ROC no longer represents China as a member of the United Nations, after UN members voted in 1971 to recognize the PRC instead. Meanwhile, the ROC continued to claim to be the legitimate representative of China and its territory, although this has been downplayed since its democratization in the 1990s. Taiwan is claimed by the PRC, which refuses diplomatic relations with countries that recognise the ROC. Taiwan maintains official diplomatic relations with 14 out of 193 UN member states and the Holy See, though many others maintain unofficial diplomatic ties with Taiwan through representative offices and institutions that function as de facto embassies and consulates. International organisations in which the PRC participates either refuse to grant membership to Taiwan or allow it to participate only on a non-state basis under various names. Domestically, the major political contention is between parties favouring eventual Chinese unification and promoting a pan-Chinese identity contrasted with those aspiring to independence and promoting a Taiwanese identity, although both sides have moderated their positions to broaden their appeal.

 

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www.davidwestphotography.co.uk // +44 (0)7403418359