UK & destination wedding photographer

Destination Wedding Photographer

French Riviera

- Wedding Photography -

Wedding Photographer French Riviera

Wedding Photographer French Riviera

Hi If you’re reading this it’s likely that you’re searching for a wedding photographer for your big day in French Riviera (great location by the way ).. needless to say  I’m so glad you decided to visit my web page ,  if you have the time why not stay and take a look around at some of my work, you can visit my portfolio HERE, or even see some real weddings HERE I’m pretty confident  you can find many reasons to choose us to photograph your wedding day in French Riviera.

Why choose me for you photography?

My name is  David,  I am an award winning destination wedding photographer who loves the fun, atmosphere and the all round celebration of weddings, I offer a unique contemporary way of photographing a wedding, I often appeal to the non-traditionalist, stylish yet contemporary couple. Based in the North East ,England, I capture weddings all across the UK, and around Europe and the World . 

I’m so very passionate about my work , I find inspiration all around me and love to use any available light to by advantage and use additional light for the more creative image. I have had the pleasure of photographing in French Riviera on a few occasions, the architecture of French Riviera lends itself to creative wedding photography.

I take pleasure in playing an integral role in two people joining in marriage but I’m a firm believer in the fact that a wedding is so much more than exchanging words and work to capture every emotion felt and each special moment, translating the true joy of the day through creative imagery.

 Where ever you are in the world, I’d love to be part of it.. I look forward to hear from you.

David -x-

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A little about wedding photography at the French Riviera

The French Riviera (known in French as the Côte d’Azur [kot dazyʁ]; Occitan: Còsta d’Azur [ˈkɔstɔ daˈzyʀ]; literal translation “Azure Coast”) is the Mediterranean coastline of the southeast corner of France. There is no official boundary, but it is usually considered to extend from Cassis, Toulon or Saint-Tropez on the west to Menton at the France–Italy border in the east, where the Italian Riviera joins. The coast is entirely within the Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur region of France. The Principality of Monaco is a semi-enclave within the region, surrounded on three sides by France and fronting the Mediterranean. Riviera is an Italian word that corresponds to the ancient Ligurian territory, wedged between the Var and Magra rivers. The Côte d’Azur or French Riviera, is a nickname given by France to the County of Nice after its annexation in 1860, because the rain and the Mistral (south French cold wind) were stopped by the Alps and the climate was similar to that of the north of Italy, even in winter, with a sky as blue as its sea, the French Riviera. When the Mistral and the Tramontane are blowing, this provokes an upwelling phenomenon between Languedoc and Provence : they push the surface waters out to sea and bring deeper, cooler waters up to the seaside. Consequently, on these beaches, the temperature of the Mediterranean can be very cool in summer depending on the wind regime. This phenomenon is observed very little or not on the coast between the French Riviera and the Italian Riviera. After the 2000s it was extended to the rest of Southern France, although the geography, culture or climate is different. The County of Nice is a mountainous area like Italy which stands out from the South of France. While the Saharan warm wind Sirocco blows over Italy, the cold wind Mistral blows over the south of France. As the County of Nice is protected by the Alps, it has a northern Italian climate. This corresponds to the mountain range of the Apennines and Ligurian Alps and located between the rivers of Var and Magra.

This coastline was one of the first modern resort areas. It began as a winter health resort for the British upper class at the end of the 18th century. With the arrival of the railway in the mid-19th century, it became the playground and vacation spot of British, Russian, and other aristocrats, such as Queen Victoria, Tsar Alexander II and King Edward VII, when he was Prince of Wales. In the summer, it also played home to many members of the Rothschild family. In the first half of the 20th century, it was frequented by artists and writers, including Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse, Francis Bacon, Edith Wharton, Somerset Maugham and Aldous Huxley, as well as wealthy Americans and Europeans. After World War II, it became a popular tourist destination and convention site. Many celebrities, such as Elton John and Brigitte Bardot, have homes in the region. Officially, the French Riviera is home to 163 nationalities with 83,962 foreign residents, although estimates of the number of non-French nationals living in the area are often much higher. Its largest city is Nice, which has a population of 340,017 as of 2017. The city is the centre of a métropole – Nice-Côte d’Azur – bringing together 49 communes and more than 540,000 inhabitants and 943,000 in the urban area. Nice is home to Nice Côte d’Azur Airport, France’s third-busiest airport (after Charles de Gaulle Airport and Orly Airport), which is on an area of partially reclaimed coastal land at the western end of the Promenade des Anglais. A second airport at Mandelieu was once the region’s commercial airport, but is now mainly used by private and business aircraft.

The A8 autoroute runs through the region, as does the old main road generally known as the Route nationale 7 (officially now DN7 in Var and D6007 in Alpes-Maritimes). High-speed trains serve the coastal region and inland to Grasse, with the TGV Sud-Est service reaching Nice-Ville station in five and a half hours from Paris. The French Riviera has a total population of more than two million. It contains the seaside resorts of Cap-d’Ail, Beaulieu-sur-Mer, Saint-Jean-Cap-Ferrat, Villefranche-sur-Mer, Antibes, Juan-les-Pins, Cannes, Saint-Raphaël, Fréjus, Sainte-Maxime and Saint-Tropez. It is also home to a high tech and science park (French: technopole) at Sophia-Antipolis (north of Antibes) and a research and technology centre at the University of Nice Sophia Antipolis. The region has 35,000 students, of whom 25 percent are working toward a doctorate. The French Riviera is a major yachting and cruising area with several marinas along its coast. According to the Côte d’Azur Economic Development Agency, each year the Riviera hosts 50 percent of the world’s superyacht fleet, with 90 percent of all superyachts visiting the region’s coast at least once in their lifetime. As a tourist centre, the French Riviera benefits from 310 to 330 days of sunshine per year, 115 kilometres (71 miles) of coastline and beaches, 18 golf courses, 14 ski resorts and 3,000 restaurants.

 

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www.davidwestphotography.co.uk // +44 (0)7403418359